Converted Factory Homes

29 October 2012

CNBC highlights the trend of former factories being converted to apartments, including the Blue Plate Artist Lofts.

CNBC

Converted Factory Homes

CNBC

29 October 2012

Colleen Kane

When factories are no longer factories, these sturdy structures of antique bricks and beams can be converted for many new uses. With regularity, they are turned into hotels, office space, shopping centers, restaurants, clubs, cultural and performance centers and other innovative uses.

One of the most common reuses for old factory buildings is private residences, either single-family homes or multiple-family loft complexes. Many benefits make this use so appealing: Factories have space and light galore, and they feature exposed brick and wood or steel-beam charm while adapting well to modern décor. As generations of creative people can attest, revamped industrial spaces also work great as combined work and studio space. And, finally, the sheer amount of space, when purchased in need of overhaul, can be a bargain for the enterprising buyer.

The following factories where products such as candy, garments, soap and mayonnaise were made are now places where lives are lived. While this trend has long been associated with New York, these stunning examples are from around the globe.

Blue Plate Factory
Location: New Orleans
Price: $502 to $1,550 a month for one- or two-bedroom lofts
Size: 615 to 1,647 square feet per loft

This landmark Art Moderne building was the former factory of Blue Plate Fine Foods, whose mayonnaise and other condiments were made from 1941 until the turn of the century when production moved to Tennessee. Beginning in 2009, the space underwent a $23 million renovation by Woodward Design Build, and it is now Blue Plate Artist Lofts, with 72 “mixed-income loft-style apartments designed with a leasing preference for artists.”

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